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TIG Welding

Air Products offers a full range of standard shielding gas mixtures for MIG/MAG welding for all common material types.

The shielding gases protect the weld area from atmospheric gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour. Depending on the materials being welded, these atmospheric gases can reduce the quality of the weld or make the welding process more difficult to use.

When TIG welding (tungsten inert gas), the weldpool, the hot tungsten electrode and the molten end of the filler metal are protected from the atmosphere by an envelope of inert gas. Argon is generally used, although there are quality and productivity advantages in using a mixture of either argon and helium or argon and hydrogen.

TIG welding is a high-quality welding technique with a low fusion rate. The arc burns between a tungsten electrode and the work piece; the electrode does not melt, so it acts only as a current conductor and arc carrier.

For thin sheet metal work, TIG welding can be used without a filler metal. For thicker items or when joining different materials, a filler metal is used in the form of a handheld rod or a wire supplied by a separate feed device, generally current less. In standard TIG welding the arc is free, but a variant known as plasma welding uses a secondary nozzle to constrict the arc.

Our standard gases are available in traditional cylinder sizes at 200 bar and 300 bar cylinder pressure.

Other Applications

Contact Information

Product NameDescription/BenefitsDownloads
Gases

Shielding Gases
Argon

The primary function of the shielding gas in gas shielded arc welding has been to protect molten and heated metal from the damaging effects of the surrounding air and to provide suitable conditions for the arc. If air comes in contact with the molten or heated metal, the oxygen in the air will oxidize the metal, the nitrogen might cause porosity or brittleness in the weld metal, and moisture from the air might also cause porosity. Argon (Ar) is an inert gas. This means that it does not oxidize and that it has no effect on the chemical composition of the weld metal. Argon is the main component in most shielding gases for GMA and GTA welding.

The primary function of the shielding gas in gas shielded arc welding has been to protect molten and heated metal from the damaging effects of the surrounding air and to provide suitable conditions for the arc. If air comes in contact with the molten or heated metal, the oxygen in the air will oxidize the metal, the nitrogen might cause porosity or brittleness in the weld metal, and moisture from the air might also cause porosity. Argon (Ar) is an inert gas. This means that it does not oxidize and that it has no effect on the chemical composition of the weld metal. Argon is the main component in most shielding gases for GMA and GTA welding.

Helium

Helium (He) is, like argon, an inert gas. Helium is used together with argon and/or a few percent of CO2 or O2 for GMA welding of stainless steel. In its pure state, or mixed with argon, it is used as shielding gas for GTA and MIG welding. Compared with argon, helium provides better side wall penetration and higher welding speeds, by generating a more energy-rich arc. Helium has several unique characteristics that make it advantageous for welding applications. Its high ionization potential, high thermal conductivity and inertness offer benefits—such as higher travel speeds and better quality welds—that can translate into greater productivity and reduced labour costs.

Helium (He) is, like argon, an inert gas. Helium is used together with argon and/or a few percent of CO2 or O2 for GMA welding of stainless steel. In its pure state, or mixed with argon, it is used as shielding gas for GTA and MIG welding. Compared with argon, helium provides better side wall penetration and higher welding speeds, by generating a more energy-rich arc. Helium has several unique characteristics that make it advantageous for welding applications. Its high ionization potential, high thermal conductivity and inertness offer benefits—such as higher travel speeds and better quality welds—that can translate into greater productivity and reduced labour costs.

Shielding Mixtures

Air Products' shielding gases are commonly used in several welding processes, mostly MIG/MAG and TIG welding. The shielding gases protect the weld area from atmospheric gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour. Depending on the materials being welded, these atmospheric gases can reduce the quality of the weld or make the welding process more difficult to use.

Air Products' shielding gases are commonly used in several welding processes, mostly MIG/MAG and TIG welding. The shielding gases protect the weld area from atmospheric gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapour. Depending on the materials being welded, these atmospheric gases can reduce the quality of the weld or make the welding process more difficult to use.

Audit Services/Leak Detection

Our application engineers can work with your plant personnel to analyze and understand your entire process. Based on that analysis and your needs, they can recommend process improvement solutions that can help you enhance product quality and consistency, plus optimize gas use. Air Products services include leak-checking, furnace profiling, analytical calibration, gas analysis process troubleshooting and overall process review.

Our application engineers can work with your plant personnel to analyze and understand your entire process. Based on that analysis and your needs, they can recommend process improvement solutions that can help you enhance product quality and consistency, plus optimize gas use. Air Products services include leak-checking, furnace profiling, analytical calibration, gas analysis process troubleshooting and overall process review.

Training

Training can include gas atmosphere safety, properties of gases, metal treating applications, NFPA 86, piping and flow control panel requirements, and troubleshooting for atmosphere problems. This information can help keep your furnace operations safe and help prevent accidents.

Training can include gas atmosphere safety, properties of gases, metal treating applications, NFPA 86, piping and flow control panel requirements, and troubleshooting for atmosphere problems. This information can help keep your furnace operations safe and help prevent accidents.

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